Reflection: A Year in the Life of an Audiovisual Archivist – Part 4

Audiovisual Access

I am not alone in the belief that access is an intrinsic part of preservation. In the past, the RAC — like many institutions — relied upon the creation of optical media discs (DVD or CD) for on-site researcher access. Beyond the person-hours required to create these discs, there were other issues such as retrieval time; the cumbersome process of loading discs into a player; and monitoring discs for on-going damage and wear and tear. My topmost concern, however, remained the long-term stability of these discs and the increasingly difficult-to-find drives necessary for playback. In short, we needed a new solution to the issue of audiovisual access.

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Reflection: A Year in the Life of an Audiovisual Archivist – Part 2

Audiovisual Processing

I feel fortunate that the RAC has always gathered and/or maintained some form of documentation for their roughly 13,000 films, video, and audio elements. However, as with any archival institution, this information has been collected by several different individuals, who have sometimes employed different approaches over the course of many “eras” of RAC’s history. Applying consistency to audiovisual description became one of the first goals undertaken.

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Get Ready to Meet Your MatchBox

It is hard to predict when inspiration is going to hit. While a great idea can strike quickly, realizing it is a longer process; one that often requires seeking the help and guidance of others. Luckily, at the RAC, I have coworkers who are ready to listen to new ideas and willing to help me figure out how to turn inspiration into reality. Today, I am very excited to share with you a recent example of such a collaboration and the RAC’s newest application: MatchBox.

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Replacing Refids for Automation and Standardization

A few months ago, I wrote about selected digitization readings and how we were going to use them to overhaul our digitization workflows. We’re now a couple of months into our new digitization workflow, and things are starting to run smoothly, but during the process, we noticed that we wanted a better way to match our digitized files to their description without using semantic filenames or separate metadata sheets. Continue reading

Getting More Out of (and Into) Your Collections Management System: DACSspace

Recently, I attended METRO’s Annual Conference where I presented on a panel titled “Getting More Out of (and Into) Your Collections Management System.” I spoke about my experience learning to code as a processing archivist and developing DACSspace. The following is the text from my presentation.

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Getting More Out of (and Into) Your Collections Management System: Digital Media Log

The following is the text from the talk I gave at METRO’s Annual Conference held this year on January 11, 2017. This talk was part of the panel “Getting More Out of (and Into) Your Collections Management System.”

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Cross-Origin Resource Sharing for ArchivesSpace

We’ve written a lot on this blog about things we’re doing with the ArchivesSpace API, ranging from find and replace operations in notes to reporting on our DACS compliance across our repository. It should be pretty obvious we’re big fans of the power and flexibility it provides to automate what otherwise would be some pretty tedious and error-prone, and also that the data model is getting us to think about archival description outside of the EAD box. Continue reading

DACSspace: An ArchivesSpace DACS Compliance Evaluation Tool

As the newest member of the Processing Team, I have been working on writing a DACS compliance evaluation script called DACSspace. Creating this tool came with a lot of “firsts” – this was my first experience writing code as well as interacting with an API. After a successful (yet sometimes frustrating) three months, I am excited to introduce DACSspace to the archival community and share a reflection of my work.

To view DACSspace on GitHub click here.

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